Monday, July 26, 2010

Free Irish Records Online

If you are researching your Ancestors from Northern Ireland then you will have come across Proni. It is well worth spending a few hours again looking at what they have online. I spent this afternoon looking through the e-catalogue.
The eCatalogue is a fully search able database containing over one million catalogue entries relating to PRONI’s archives. The e-catalogue is the end result of the electronic catalogue for Northern Ireland (eCATNI) project.
A PRONI archive can range from a single document to many thousands of documents. Each archive has a unique reference number and can be further sub-divided into related areas or topics.
The search facility allows you to find catalogue entries using text, date or PRONI Reference Number searches.
The browse facility allows you to navigate up and down the various levels of a catalogue.
The catalogue entries describe the records held in PRONI. If you want to see the records they relate to firsthand, you will have to visit PRONI.

http://www.proni.gov.uk/index/search_the_archives/ecatalogue.htm

Thursday, July 15, 2010

Clough, County Down, Ireland

If you are researching your Ancestors from Ireland you will understand how confusing it is with all the little towns and parish's. I had been convinced that my Grandfather's brothers had been born in Clough, County Down. All the records said 'Clough' as their place of birth. After speaking to my uncle, he explained that Clough was where the Doctor lived and so all the births around that area were recorded as Clough. A reminder that we should always check with our older relatives.

Thankyou to Ann for sending me this description of Clough and and the townlands around it.
Clough is a small village about 4 miles from the town land of Drumnaquoile. Drumnaquoile is about 4 miles from the town of Castlewellan and the same from Ballynahinch and Newcastle. The townland of Drumnaquoile is on very high ground and so beautiful it - looks down on Dundrum Bay. Dundrum is a small village which is also within a 4 mile radius of Drumnaquoile. Dundrum is on the coast and this is where the coal boats came in with coal from England from the Whitehaven area . That is the way that most of our ancestors crossed the Irish Sea (in 1800's) on this coal boat, they could easily walk to Dundrum from Drumnaquoile. If you have a look on the map you will see Dundrum is directly opposite Cumberland. The lake district also seems to be the exact same terrain they were leaving. It would look like they flitted across back and forwards this way.

Monday, July 5, 2010

Sharing Your Genealogy

A few days ago i made a connection on my family tree. It was on some research that i had started a few years ago and had stopped as i was not getting anywhere.We have all been there,given up when not getting anywhere against the brick wall.
I belong to a group researching the same area so i get e-mails every time someone makes a posting. I do not always read the mails but this one just caught my eye so i sent a reply and then received one back, we had a connection. This does not happen very often so when it does its very exciting.
So next comes the sharing of all the information and rechecking this information for the source. This is why we need to keep good records of all our sources,then we can recheck easily.
I spent a few hours today looking at the marriage records on Ancestry Ireland . Its free to search and easy to keep putting in different years and names to find the record that you are looking for .To view the full record it costs 4 pounds.
Take a look

http://www.ancestryireland.com/